Shonto Gallery

This was the website for the Shonto Gallery. Content is from the site's archived pages from 2006-2009

Shonto’s downtown Flagstaff gallery on Aspen Ave. above Downtown Diner

Paintings that fit your budget and into your backpack


Shonto's Current Events :

Navajo Festival of Arts and Culture
June 29th - 30th 2006
Museum of Northern Az
Flagstaff, Az

 

Turquoise Tortoise Gallery
August 4th 2006
First Friday Art Talk
Hozho Center  - 431 Hwy 179
 Sedona, Arizona  86336
www.turqtortsedona.com
928-282-2262

 

Petrified National Forest
September 9th - 16th 2006
Artist in residence.
Northeastern Arizona

 

Brandy's Restaurant & Bakery
Art on display
September 4th - October 16th
Art Talk & Party on
September 25th ,2006 5:30 - 8pm
www.brandysrestaurant.com

Take a trip Along the Navajo Trail to Shonto Begay’s 8th annual art show at Brandy’s Restaurant & Bakery this September. Begay, an award-winning Navajo painter, illustrator and writer, shares acrylic on canvas works inspired by his journeys. 

“I share visions of my road thus far,” Shonto says. “I offer you the colors, movement and composition of the beautiful land that forges my spirit. These are my journeys through the potholes and avenues of life’s tests and blessings and the sacred land I call my home.”

Shonto, whose paintings are represented at the Turquoise Tortoise Gallery in Sedona and the Medicine Man Gallery in Tucson, says he’s proud of being a part of Brandy’s art show tradition. “I applaud Brandy’s for being one of the first alternative places to see art in Flagstaff,” he says.

 

Shonto Begay - Diné artist

Maternal Clan: Bitter Water      Paternal Clan: Salt Clan

In Navajo, the word Shonto refers to light reflecting off water. A similar glint is in Shonto Begay’s eyes when his paintbrush meets canvas. Shonto’s writings and paintings capture a moment of Diné, the people.

Born on a Navajo reservation sheep camp to a weaver of Tonalea storm patterns and a respected medicine man, as a boy Shonto was removed from his hogan home and forced to attend a government boarding school away from his family and culture. Now he reclaims his identity through his art, balancing the harsh realities of reservation life with the amazing beauty found among its canyons and mesas. “I am very mindful that painting has saved my life many times over,” says Shonto. “It is how I’ve been able to dilute and even heal my own personal tragedies.”

Shonto’s images include truck beds full of families, hitchhikers and mesas that seem to go on forever. From first light upon the red earth to images of Manhattan, his impressionistic brushstrokes depict moments in time that pay homage to his memories or state his concerns about the environment and encroaching development.

Shonto is a volunteer with Grand Canyon Chapter of the Sierra Club, Black Mesa Trust and the Save the Peaks efforts. For more information about Native people, land and resources, visit :www.nativemovement.org  www.swfa.org  www.blackmesawatercoalition.org and www.blackfire.net

“From Beneath The Blanket” acrylic on canvas, 2005

Shonto's multi-award winning work has been featured at the Museum of Northern Arizona, Heard Museum in Phoenix, The Smithsonian Institute, the American Indian Contemporary Arts Museum in San Francisco, Arizona State Museum the American Indian Community House Gallery in New York City. His mural work and pen and ink drawings of the Navajo Legend of the Hero Twins are on display at the Wheelwright Museum of the American Indian in Santa Fe.

"Flagstaff Bound," acrylic on canvas, 2003

 

2009

Southwest Indian Art Fair

Saturday and Sunday, Feb. 21 and 22, 2009

Arizona State Museum, University of Arizona campus in Tucson

51st Annual Heard Museum Guild Indian Fair & Market
Saturday and Sunday, March 7 and 8, 2009

9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.

2301 N. Central Ave. Phoenix, AZ 85004

First Friday Art Walk

April 3, 2009

Shonto is featured in the Arizona State Museum’s collection, “Connections Across Generations:
The Avery Collection of American Indian Paintings” at the University of Arizona.

 

“From Beneath The Blanket” acrylic on canvas, 2005

Shonto's multi-award winning work has been featured at the Museum of Northern Arizona, Heard Museum in Phoenix, The Smithsonian Institute, the American Indian Contemporary Arts Museum in San Francisco, Arizona State Museum the American Indian Community House Gallery in New York City. His mural work and pen and ink drawings of the Navajo Legend of the Hero Twins are on display at the Wheelwright Museum of the American Indian in Santa Fe.

 

ShontoGallery.com